Methods & Tools

FutureMARES is designed to provide policy advice underpinned by the strongest available techniques for projecting the ecological, social and economic benefits of nature-based solutions under different climate change scenarios. We address this goal by advancing state-of-the-art tools and approaches to position European biodiversity and climate research and the forefront of global activities. 

Our project partners use a step-wise integration of the results of different, state-of-the-art methods to produce coherent, implementable recommendation on how best to use nature-based solutions for climate change adaptation and mitigation. The overall goal of our work is the stewardship of the biodiversity and ecosystem services provided by marine and transitional (coastal) waters.

 

These are the eight key methods applied by FutureMARES to achieve its ambitious goals:

1. Future Scenarios of Climate Change and NBS

FutureMARES will develop a set of Political, Environmental, Social, Technological, Legal and Economic (“PESTLE”) scenarios which will map onto the four IPCC Regional Concentration Pathways and five Shared Socioeconomic Pathways (SSPs). These future scenarios draw on outputs and developments from the IPCC, IPBES and UNEP and the work of project partners in these international groups and previous projects. We thus provide future scenarios for simulating climate change effects on social-ecological systems. These FutureMARES scenarios can then be used in simulations for other habitats and species contributing to IPCC and IPBES reports.

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2. Ecological Knowledge needed for planning effective NBS

The approach used in FutureMARES identifies and quantifies the key links between biodiversity and ecosystem services with socio-economic aspects in the present and under future scenarios of climate change for European regional seas and CELAC regions. These links can be formulated as indicators and their tipping points. 

© 2020 by FutureMARES

This project receives funding from the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under grant agreement No 869300

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